The Tesla battery: the final solution for a greener home? (Part 2)

As a continuation of last week's article where we were analysing ways to "cut the wires off" from the main electrical companies, we discovered that the main problem is the storage of the energy produced by solar panels, being this the main predicament in a sunny country such as Spain.

 

We also came to the conclusion that the main problem is the low capacity of the standards batteries available in the market. As the capacities of storage for most current batteries are about 3 days.

 

Tesla could supply the demands of an average home for about a week. Sufficient time to allow the sun to reappear and charge our depleted batteries. Believe it or not these circumstances do occur in the sunny Spain.

 

Li-ion or hydrogen batteries?

We then scrutinized the characteristics of Li-ion or hydrogen batteries.

 

Hydrogen, although they have more autonomy than lithium-ion, its production and distribution are more expensive.

 

On the other hand, there are already lithium-ion batteries which have allowed Tesla to position itself as a real threat to the traditional car taking into account its autonomy level.

 

What about using the new Tesla Battery?

The so called Gigafactory is the key part of this gigantic project that is Tesla, but for the year 2020 will only be able to supply approximately a total of 500,000 Tesla batteries to the market.

 

Therefore, if the company wants to produce more batteries not intended for their cars there are two options: either build more factories or to delegate production to a third party.

 

Right now the Tesla battery cells are manufactured by Panasonic, although it is the Musk Company who handles the process and turn them into batteries. The equation could be repeated here, a third party could manufacture the cells for Tesla to  convert them in individual and installable home products.

 

Jeff Evanson statements also seem to go in that direction: The "Tesla Home Battery" would be the same as the ones already assembled in the Tesla cars but with a special stand that would allow it to fixed onto a wall. This battery will have much more capacity but would also be much more expensive.

 

If we take it into perspective, the whole process makes sense. SolarCity is responsible for installation and production of solar panels for homes, Tesla is responsible for providing a product that serves a car or to store the surplus produced by the solar panels at home. Bingo.

 

They are trying to figure out how to fit something that would be a flat battery, similar to the ones used on the cars Model S, with a thickness of about 5 inches to be fitted on a wall inside our homes without been offensive to the eye. A good design problem, I must say.

 

Another option, however, also remains likely. Tesla factory in Fremont, California, already produces high-capacity batteries for specific customers on demand. It would be a relatively high price ($ 3000), but low enough to make long-term valid investment in conjunction with a renewable energy source.

 

Another idea that they are thinking is to offer their customers to pay an initial fee of  1500$  to the company followed by small payments during the next 10 years. The total amount would be around $ 3300 US dollars.

 

That would leave the initial payment to the level of a medium / high electronics product let's say the price of a MacBook Retina, without going any further, while the rest is paid in quite affordable instalments. In return, Tesla can monitor the usage and consumption systems, analyze them internally as they should be able to claim them after a decade. It would be therefore be a system of transfer or leasing similar to that already exists with some car manufacturers. There will be two options: 10 or 15 kWh, both more than enough to power an average household. 

 

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  • #1

    Teofila Henegar (domingo, 22 enero 2017 17:43)


    Everything is very open with a really clear explanation of the issues. It was truly informative. Your website is useful. Many thanks for sharing!